Journal Of Stories & Aesthetics.

Interviews. Editorials. Articles. Conversations. Things. Events.

I Am Not My Weave

“Do you wear a weave because you like white men?” Ladies and gentlemen, this is ignorance at its finest. I was 17 years old when I got my first weave and I have never looked back. 

 

I love my styles and I genuinely feel I look better with long flowing curly, wavy or straight hair. I am not ashamed to say that I am the woman who would not think twice about paying hundreds of pounds for that quality Brazilian hair.

 

In recent years there has been a significant growth of women of colour, ditching the weaves and going au’ natural. I love it, appreciate it and adore the God given hair we have been born with. I have many friends and associates whom in the past would have sported a mane that could test Pocahontus, however, the majority of them have now gone for the ‘big chop’, wearing their hair in locks or bountiful afro styles. I think it’s wonderful to see but for some reason unknown, my long beautiful Brazilian locks have caused some offence.

 

I have received comments from strangers in the street who presume that I am not proud to be a black woman because of my expensive extensions. Oh don’t cry for me! I can give as good as I get, just ask the Rastafarian who I had a recent confrontation with in an East London Market. The one thing that does bug me is that there are some people who I have known for years are coaxing me to join the natural hair crew like it depended on my salvation.

 

“You still wearing this thing?” they would ask taking a lock and throwing it down like it was venomous. Really what does it matter how I wear my hair? My hair style does not make me or anybody else who likes to wear a weave any less of a person. I am surprised how strongly some individuals feel about us “not loving ourselves enough” women who wear weaves. I have heard the arguments about the world telling us about the perception of beauty, but sometimes it is just about some people (me included) look better with hair!

 

I am educated, kind, thoughtful, well mannered, a good mother, own my own home and very much aware of my culture! Does this not all count for anything unless I am rocking a twist out? But hey, if it's any consolation, I have not relaxed my natural hair for 5 years!

 

All women, especially women of colour go through enough challenges in life, why throw a hairstyle into the equation? What anybody wears upon their body is an individual choice and regardless of our personal opinions we do not have a right to express it so rudely. Live and let live and enjoy life, judging and discriminating against somebody because of a hairstyle is absolute madness.

 

African Diva Project By Margaret Rose Vendryes

Remel London